Bread Maker White Spelt Loaf recipe

White spelt loaf cut in half
  1. White spelt loaf cut in half
  2. A 50% white spelt, 50% wholemeal spelt loaf
Update

I've made a 50% white, 50% wholemeal spelt loaf (see the second picture). I increased the water from 310ml to 320ml.

As much as I love making sourdough bread sometimes I can’t be bothered to wait for the starter to ferment. For this white spelt loaf I put the ingredients into the bread maker after breakfast and the bread was ready by lunch time. I used to make spelt loaves from start to finish in the bread maker but now I get it to just prepare the dough then I bake it in the oven. I seem to get a better, crispier crust and the inside of the loaf is soft and delicious. We ate it fresh out of the oven with tuna mayo, which was glorious, but that wasn't enough so we ate more slices with peanut butter then had to go for a walk to digest it all.

I used 100% white spelt flour and the dough was incredibly sticky and pillowy. Although it couldn’t hold its shape as much as the sourdough, the final result was a lovely round cob, slightly flattened but miles better than the square spelt loaves the bread maker usually produces. If I can get hold of some wholegrain spelt flour then the next loaf will be a 50-50 mix.

Note: I used the speciality dough setting on my Panasonic ZB2512 bread maker, which does a 15-30 minute knead, including a period of rest.

Ingredients

Serves: 8

  • 500g white spelt flour
  • 1½ tsp sugar
  • 1½ tsp salt
  • 10g butter
  • 310ml water (if your room is hot then use chilled water)
  • 1¼ tsp dried yeast (I use Allinson Easy Bake Yeast)
  • flour or semolina (for dusting)

Method

  1. Put the blade into the bread tin. Add 500g of white spelt flour, 1½ teaspoons of sugar, 1½ teaspoons of salt, 10g of butter and 310ml of water into the loaf tin then put it into the bread maker. Add 1¼ teaspoons of yeast to the yeast dispenser and select an appropriate dough setting (for me, it's menu 30 on my Panasonic ZB2512 bread maker, which takes 2 hours 45 minutes).
  2. If using a banneton basket, dust the inside with flour or semolina.
  3. Once the dough cycle has finished, tip the dough onto a floured work surface and lightly dust with flour or semolina. Transfer the dough to the banneton basket if using (mine is a 500g round banneton) or else put it into a large bowl. Cover and leave to prove somewhere warm (around 30°C) for 40 minutes.
  4. Place a sheet of greaseproof paper onto a baking tray and preheat the oven to 220°C (200°C fan).
  5. After 40 minutes the dough should have risen. Tip onto the baking tray and bake for around 20-25 minutes (but check after 15 minutes). It's done when the crust is a pale golden brown and the bread sounds hollow when tapped.

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